Training on Reproductive Health and the Environment

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Hi all,
 
This November, the Sierra Club Global Population and Environment Program is co-hosting the 7th annual “One Voice Summit: Linking Reproductive Health and the Environment” – a 3-day training and advocacy workshop for young people under the age of 25 to learn about the intersections between reproductive health, family planning, population, climate change, and sustainability. The training will be held in Washington, DC from November 16-19th, and all expenses are paid for accepted participants.
 
Ten youth will be selected to attend as Sierra Club Global Population Fellows, and will receive up to $1000 after the summit to implement their own campaigns on campus around these linked issues. Please pass along the online application to any one else who may be interested in attending. 
 
Applications are due September 30th. 
 
Best,
 

Kim Lovell

Program Director

Sierra Club Global Population & Environment Program
50 F St NW, Washington, DC 20001
 
The fate of the world is in your hands and your pants

City of Tacoma- Sustainability Intern Position

Job Description:

The intern, along with a full-time AmeriCorps member, will conduct intensive outreach to educate and change sustainable behaviors in the Wapato Lake neighborhood, in South Tacoma. The intern, with assistance from the Wapato Lake Sustainability Management Team, will develop appropriate education materials, as well as conduct personal outreach through a variety of strategies, including door-to-door encounters. The members will keep detailed accounts of each interaction and follow up with the appropriate service or program provider. Additionally, the members will engage with existing community groups, including churches, and schools. The members will develop workshops and volunteer events from January to June of 2013. Door-to-door encounters, as well as volunteer events and workshops may occur at night and/or on weekends; members will be required to be available during such times.

The intern will engage citizens in a range of sustainability topics, including recycling, air quality, energy conservation, storm water prevention, and urban forestry. Through training from the Management Team staff, the intern will be able to promote and make connections to the multitude of existing programs offered by the various organizations. This coordinated delivery will increase synergy and effectiveness of all programs.

Job Duties and Responsibilities:

Under guidance of the Wapato Sustainability Management Team and alongside the AmeriCorps volunteer, the intern will:

  • Conduct door-to-door outreach to approximately 2000 households
  • Track encounters, follow up with appropriate agencies and circle back with residents
  • Develop outreach events, including speaking at community groups and forums and facilitating workshops
  • Collaborate with partnering agencies to develop neighborhood action days to include neighborhood cleanup, tree planting, rain garden installation, and porch light change out
  • Collaborate with local schools, and other community organizations to educate their students and members and recruit volunteers
  • Reach out to other organizations in the City that provide community services. Be knowledgeable about their programs (to refer to individuals) and look for opportunities to partner on projects or programs
  • Track progress and develop reports
  • Work alongside the steering committee to organize vendors and volunteers, as well as handle general logistics, at the 6th Annual Sustainability Expo held in early March.

 

 

Qualifications Required for this Position:

  • You must currently be enrolled in a college program to be eligible for this position
  • Must have a flexible schedule, including working days, nights and weekends
  • Comfortable talking with strangers and groups
  • Good with understanding and communicating a variety of sustainability topics
  • Excellent organization, including event and meeting planning and facilitation
  • Tracking data; report writing is required
  • Strong attention to detail and excellent Word, Excel, and PowerPoint skills
  • Marketing and sales skills desirable
  • Ability to work independently and on teams
  • Prioritize and see projects through to completion
  • Knowledge of sustainability issues required

 

Length of Internship:

October 10th 2012- July 13th 2013

Hours:

15-19 hours/week

Pay:

$11.47/hour

Additional Information:

Conditions of work will include office and computer work, as well as neighborhood “field work”. This will include ability to drive, take the bus, and walk door-to-door. Individuals must be able to lift 25 lbs.

Please send your cover letter and resume to Christina Zinkgraf at czinkgraf@cityoftacoma.org by Wednesday, September 26th at 5:00pm. Interviews will be held October 1st and 2nd.

Minutes from May Sustainability Committee Meeting

Sustainability Committee

 

5/10/12                           Chair: Kevin O’Brien3:45-5:00 PM                 Treasurer: Ethan Mathey

UC 134                              Secretary:  Stena Troyer                                            Pro-Tem Secretary: Romey Haberle
 

Members Present:

Ethan Manthey, Emma Straus, Chrissy Cooley, Carmen Eyssautier, Gretchen Howell, Caitlyn Jackson, Carolyn Hylander, Saiyare Refaei, Brett Rousseau, Kenny Stancil, Tyler Wilson, Emily Dooley, Romey Haberle, Susan Harmon, Kevin O’Brien, Wendy Robbins, Joe Bell, Joe Kowalczyk, Sheri Tonn, Rose McKenney, and Nathalie op de Beeck.

1. Reports from 2011-12 Sustainability Fellows

Carrie Hylander –      Food Justice and PLU: Carrie reported on her study of food justice in the Parkland and Pierce County community.  She researched what issues face those living in poverty to have access to healthy food. Although Parkland is not a food desert, with two major grocers in the area selling fresh produce, options here are more limited than in higher income Pierce County areas such as North Tacoma, Steilacoom, and Gig Harbor.  She proposed building a Farm-to-School approach by using the PLU After School Enrichment Program (ASEP-Big Buddies) at James Sales Elementary School. She suggests setting up a relationship using the Big Buddies program to link with a local farm or farmers for farm visits as well as supply fresh produce directly to the school.

Caitlyn Jackson –       The Sustainability of Sustainability. Caitlyn studied the degree to which sustainability programming is reaching students and if it changes behavior.  She conducted a review of sustainability programs on other campuses, organized focus groups and conducted interviews of 20 students.  She found that it was difficult to get students willing to participate who weren’t all ready interested in or involved in consciously making sustainably aware choices.  Some suggestions as to what is working here at PLU is out great infrastructure (recycling bins, composting, for example), a general culture shift (and peer pressure), and little things (Daily Flyer, Unplugged) that increase awareness. Specific suggestions for how PLU could do better in the future is to continue to engage more people to think critically about Sustainability, by incorporating sustainability themes into the curriculum through a course requirement that is balanced with the diversity requirement.  Additionally, moving the Sustainability Office closer into the center of campus would make it more accessible and raise its profile.

Brett Rousseau –       Sustainability in the Curriculum: Brett’s work focused on how to better integrate sustainability into the classroom at PLU.  She conducted a student retreat to start the conversation, and this retreat will now be an annual event.  She also conducted a survey of departments and schools on campus to unearth all classes in which sustainability themes are incorporated into at least part of the curriculum.  109 courses currently do just that, and reach about 890% of our students.  To further integrate sustainability learning into the curriculum, Brett has organized 20 faculty members interested and willing to participate in running a forum at University Conference 2012 to address the possibility of a Sustainability academic requirement for all PLU students, similar to the Diversity requirement.

 2. Introduction of 2012-13 Sustainability Fellows

Saiyare Refaei –         Carbon Emissions & Meat Consumption – Saiyare proposes studying the carbon footprint of meat consumption on PLU campus, conduct a survey to investigate changes in student consumption, and develop a green guide for students to reduce meat eating.

Kenneth Stancil –      Examining Irrigation Practices & Rainwater Usage – Kenny will be studying ways in with the campus may reduce irrigation by reusing storm water through rain barrels and other rain catchment systems.

Tyler Wilson –           Restoration of the Morken Meadow – Tyler will research how other Puget Sound institutions have successfully restored South Puget Sound Prairie to develop a plan for restoration of our Morken Meadow, which although blessed with some natives (including the 1000s of camas bulbs moved out of bulldozers’ way in March 2012 by student volunteers), the field is choked with non-native weeds.

 

 

3. Approval of Minutes from April 12 Meeting: The meetings were unanimously approved, with the addition of Gretchen Howell to the attendees.

 4. Election of a Chair for Next Year: Geosciences professor Rose McKenney was nominated and elected unanimously to serve as Chair of the committee for 2012-2013.

 5.  Announcements and Requests

-Dining Services has converted to all compostable flatware, saving 140lbs of plastic waste per years.  The new compostable sandwich wraps are saving 3,500 feet of plastic wrap, and lids have been found for the existing 16oz plastic tumblers used in the dining halls, thus allowing them to serve as To Go containers.

– There is approximately $5000 left in Grean Fees.  This money will be used for several small projects in Facilities unless last minute proposals come in from students.

– The new Campus entrance in front of Harstaad will be paved with pervious concrete and incorporate rain gardens.

– Eastvold Phase II construction has a goal of reaching Lied Gold.  Phase I (the North Wing) is Lied Platinum.

– The Solar panel installation on Facilities has been delayed as the installer is currently working in C. American installing panels on orphanages and health clinics.  He will resume work upon his return in July.